ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship opportunity – call for applications in carceral geography!

Would you like to pursue postdoctoral research in carceral geography at the University of Birmingham? Have you recently received, or will you soon receive, your PhD from a University which is part of an ESRC Doctoral Training network (even if your PhD was not funded by the ESRC?) Then apply for one of FOUR ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowships on offer from the Midlands Graduate School ESTC DTP!

These fellowships are aimed at those in the immediately postdoctoral stage of their career, to provide the opportunity to consolidate their PhD through developing publications, their networks, and their research and professional skills.

The call is open to applicants who:

  • have completed or expected to complete their PhD at a research organisation that is part of a DTP or CDT,
  • have either been awarded a PhD by the submission deadline (23rd March 2018), or have submitted their thesis and passed their viva voce with minor corrections, with the expectation that the PhD will be awarded by the fellowship start date (1st October 2018).
  • have no more than 12 months of active postdoctoral experience by the closing date of the competition (23rd March 2018).

Please read the call specification and FAQ documents fully before applying.

Proposals are welcome from single or inter-disciplinary backgrounds but the fellowship activities must be aligned to one of the Midlands Graduate School DTP’s 17 accredited pathways. (eg Human Geography)

The application deadline to apply for Postdoctoral Fellowships is 16.00 on Friday 23 March 2018 – this is the national deadline set by the ESRC and applies across all 14 DTPs.

To discuss a potential Fellowship in carceral geography, please contact Dominique Moran d.moran@bham.ac.uk to discuss your eligibility and application.

In addition to completing the Postdoctoral Fellowship application form, all applicants will be required to submit the following mandatory attachments, and further details regarding these are provided in the ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowships Call specification:

  1. Case for support (maximum six sides of A4)
  2. Justification of resources (maximum two sides of A4)
  3. CV (maximum two sides of A4)
  4. List of publications
  5. Head of department statement (maximum one side of A4)
  6. Mentor statement and summary CV (maximum two sides of A4)
  7. Referee statement (maximum one side of A4)
  8. Other attachments (optional unless undertaking and overseas visit) i.e. If you are intending to visit an overseas institution within the period of the fellowship, a letter of support from the institution must be provided, supporting the visit in principle.

Call for Chapters – The Prison Cell: Embodied and Everyday Spaces of Incarceration

Victoria Knight and Jennifer Turner have been invited by Palgrave Macmillan to submit a proposal for an edited collection for the Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology book series with a focus upon the prison cell.

They are seeking an additional one or two chapters for inclusion in this already exciting collection of interdisciplinary scholarship.

If you are interested in making a contribution, they ask that you let them know of your interest at your earliest convenience, and then submit a proposed titled, an abstract of 250-300 words, and a short bio of 100 words by 28th February 2018.

Throughout the history of imprisonment, the use of cellular confinement has been instrumental in shaping the organisation of carceral space as one of reform, separation, deterrence and isolation. As Helen Johnston highlights, ‘although now often occupied by more than one prisoner, the cell has remained architecturally the most significant space in the prison’ (2010: 14). From crowded dormitories holding hundreds of debtors; and temporary holding rooms in police stations or court rooms; to graphically-design spaces with technological innovations and individual sanitation, the cell manifests in a variety of shapes and forms – each with a distinct function.  In this volume they bring together a series of chapters that negotiate the commonalities and variances of this type of carceral space and address its significance in relation to the embodied and everyday experiences of incarceration. They highlight the array of processes and practices that shape carceral life, adding to this rich area of discussion in penal scholarship, criminology, anthropology sociology and carceral geography. They extend this scholarship by providing a unique volume that provides advances in our understandings, conceptualisations and experiences of the space of the cell.

Contributions may focus upon any aspect of carceral space:

  • Prisons
  • Policing
  • Immigrant detention
  • Internment
  • Detention and mental health
  • Prisoners of war
  • Abstract notions of ‘cell’

They may include (but need not be limited to) the following areas:

  • Differing visions of the cell in different geographical contexts
  • Multi-purpose of the cell
  • Home-making (materiality, symbolic attachment, resistance to control of space)
  • Cell-sharing and overcrowding
  • Sanitation
  • Safer custody and security
  • Escape from the prison cell
  • Friendship/Loneliness
  • Drug use and contraband
  • Risk and Self-Harm (design, implementation, and unintended consequences)
  • Deprivation and human rights
  • Emotive responses
  • Mobilities in cell space/from cell-to-cell/cell transfers
  • Art and other creative uses of space
  • Media representations of cell spaces
  • The changing importance of the prison cell/refocus towards significance of other prison spaces

Victoria and Jennifer are particularly interested to hear from authors working with case studies outside of the European context.

They anticipate the following timescale for the volume:

  • First submission of chapters (c.7-10k words) to the editors required by 31st August 2018
  • Final submission of revised chapters to the editors by 31st January 2019

Please note these dates in submitting your abstract for consideration.

They hope that you will want to be involved in this exciting project, and if you would like to discuss this further, please contact them at the following:

VKnight@dmu.ac.uk

Jennifer.Turner@liverpool.ac.uk

The Society of Captives Today: Celebrating the 60th Anniversary – University of Leicester 27-28 June 2018

A conference  is being co-organised by the University of Cambridge and the University of Leicester, to mark the 60th anniversary of the publication of Gresham Sykes’s The Society of Captives. Click here for details.

The conference is being held on June 27-28 2018, at the University of Leicester. There is a very strong programme, featuring many of the most influential scholars in the field.

Bookings can be made using the following weblink:

https://www2.le.ac.uk/news/events/2018/june/the-society-of-captives-today-celebrating-the-60th-anniversary

CFP: Borders, Racisms and Harms: A Symposium – Birkbeck U.L. 2-3 May 2018

BORDERS, RACISMS, AND HARMS: A SYMPOSIUM

2–3 May 2018 | School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

Call for Participation

The current socio-political context is characterised by Brexit and Europe’s shoring up of borders in response to irregular migration via the Mediterranean, hyper-criminalisation of migrants, growth of corporate involvement in the management of migration, travel bans, rise of right-wing populism, racisms and xenophobic sentiments across much of the West, and rapid erosion of rights. At the same time, there are constantly new modes of solidarity and resistance emerging, which are also subject to state responses and controls.

This event aims to bring together scholars at various stages of their careers, third sector workers, and people with direct experience of immigration controls and borders to examine the theme of border harms from different substantive angles and theoretical perspectives. The idea of border harms encompasses the variety of ways that bordering practices produce harm and are interconnected with race and racisms. We therefore invite proposals on any of the following broad areas:

  • The policing of migration
  • Refugees and asylum seekers
  • Border deaths
  • Migration and state violence
  • Resistance, solidarity, protest, and advocacy
  • Immigration detention
  • Deportation
  • Foreign national prisoners
  • The criminalisation of solidarity
  • The politics of reform and advocacy
  • Everyday borders and bordering practices
  • Racialisation, securitisation, criminalisation, and surveillance
  • Brexit and the ‘hostile environment’
  • Populism, nationalism, and citizenship practices
  • Empire, colonialism, and state racisms

In addition to academic papers, we welcome proposals for other types of participation, including workshops, performances, and art. Participants are strongly encouraged to consider issues of race, gender, and other social factors in their contributions.

This event is interdisciplinary and will be of interest to scholars from criminology, sociology, social policy, law, human geography, anthropology, and psychology, as well as people with lived experience of border harms and NGO workers involved in practice, advocacy, policy, and research. Attendance will be free.

Confirmed keynote speakers are Professor Shahram Khosravi (Stockholm University), author of ‘Illegal’ Traveller: An Auto-Ethnography of Borders (Palgrave, 2010) and editor of After Deportation: Ethnographic Perspectives (Palgrave, 2018), and Dr Alpa Parmar (University of Oxford), Associate Director of Border Criminologies and co-editor of Race, Criminal Justice, and Migration Control: Enforcing the Boundaries of Belonging (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Please email your proposal (250 words maximum) to the symposium organisers, Monish Bhatia, Gemma Lousley, and Sarah Turnbull (Birkbeck, University of London), by 5:00pm on Friday, 6 April 2018 at BorderHarms@gmail.com. The organisers are planning a publication based on a selection of work presented at the symposium. If you arethey ask you to indicate this in your proposal.

 

Comparative Penology and Nordic Exceptionalism Conference, 1-2 Feb 2018, University of Cambridge

Carceral geographers interested in the ways in which carceral spaces are ‘entered’ and ‘left’, the experiences of those in the ‘deepest’ reaches of carceral systems, and how the penal philosophies of England & Wales, and Norway translate into daily carceral experiences, won’t want to miss the COMPEN group’s forthcoming conference at the University of Cambridge (1-2 Feb 2018).

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The Comparative Penology Group is led by Dr Ben Crewe and his research team who, since 2016, have been working on a five-year project titled: ‘Penal policymaking and the prisoner experience: a comparative analysis’. The research is based inand involves four inter-related studies of (a) penal policymaking and the penal field (b) the experience of entry into and release from custody (c) the daily experiences of female prisoners and imprisoned sex offenders, and (d) prisoners in the most secure parts of each jurisdiction’s prison system. This project is funded by the European Research Council (ERC). This conference is a milestone for the project with its international and comparative focus but also offers the opportunity to meet many other experts in the field. The programme is available here.

Registration for the conference is OPEN and costs £140 which includes lunch and coffee as well as a dinner at Peterhouse College on the 1 Feb 2018. Book by contacting .

CFP for four CGWG-sponsored sessions at the RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2018

The Carceral Geography Working Group of the RGS-IBG is delighted to encourage paper submissions to four intended sponsored sessions at the RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2018.

The conference will take place at Cardiff University 29-31 August 2018 with opening events on 28 August. The conference theme is ‘Geographical landscapes / changing landscapes of geography’. The full call for sessions and papers can be found here.

The CGWG is sponsoring four sessions, for which paper submissions are now invited.

These are:

Camps, Control and Crime: Critical geographies of security and refugee encampment

Organised by Yolanda Weima, Department of Geography, York University (Toronto), weima@yorku.ca  and Hanno Brankamp, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, hanno.brankamp@ouce.ox.ac.uk

Read the full CFP for this session here

Care as Incarceration: The Changing Landscapes of Institutional Treatment of Disabled People

Organised by Jayne Jeffries, Jayne.Jeffries@newcastle.ac.uk and Janice McLaughlin, Newcastle University (UK).

Read the full CFP for this session here

Geographies of Institutionalised Childhood

Organised by Tom Disney, University of Birmingham (T.N.Disney@bham.ac.uk) and Anna Schliehe, University of Cambridge (aks79@cam.ac.uk)

Read the full CFP for this session here

and

Tirluniau Carcharu/Tirluniau Carcharedig (Landscapes of Imprisonment/Imprisoned Landscapes)

Organised by Dominique Moran, University of Birmingham (d.moran@bham.ac.uk) and Jennifer Turner, University of Liverpool (jennifer.turner@liverpool.ac.uk)

Read the full CFP for this session here

 

 

 

 

Call for session sponsorship at the RGS-IBG Cardiff 2018

The Carceral Geography Working Group (CGWG) of the RGS-IBG is pleased to extend anMain-Building_BlueSky_GreenGrass invitation to sponsor sessions at the next RGS-IBG Annual International Conference.

The conference will take place at Cardiff University from Wednesday 29 to Friday 31 August 2018 with workshops and opening events on Tuesday 28 August.

The chair of the 2018 conference is Professor Paul Milbourne (Cardiff University). The conference theme is ‘Geographical landscapes / changing landscapes of geography’.

Since the CGWG was only founded earlier this year, we are excited to take advantage of our first opportunity to sponsor sessions at the conference!

Full call for sessions can be found here:

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Call+for+sessions+papers+and+posters/Call+for+sessions+papers+and+posters

The deadline for session proposals submissions to CGWG is Monday 18 December 2017.

Please email submissions to Dominique Moran (d.moran@bham.ac.uk), including session title and abstract (max 400 words), name(s) and affiliation(s) of the session convenor(s), and the anticipated format of the session.

Session convenors will be notified in due course as to whether or not CGWG will be able to provide sponsorship for your session. We can sponsor up to 12 session slots.

Please bear in mind that sessions cannot occupy more than two slots in the whole programme.

Once a sponsorship decision has been made, you will have until Friday 16 February 2018 to provide the full session details (with all proposed papers and presenters) for final submission to the RGS-IBG.

The full guidelines for organizing sessions can be found at:

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Call+for+sessions+papers+and+posters/How+to+organise+a+session.htm

Please note that a list of key deadlines is available at

http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Timeline.htm

We look forward to hearing from you. If you have any specific queries regarding session proposal submissions, please contact Dominique Moran (d.moran@bham.ac.uk)

Call for Committee Members for the Carceral Geography Working Group

Ordinary Members are warmly invited to join the Carceral Geography Working Group committee!

It is intended that at the first AGM of the Carceral Geography Working Group of the RGS-IBG, one or more Ordinary Members, who will become members of the CGWG committee, will be elected.

Ordinary Members will be welcome to assist in CGWG business, and particularly the organisation of events and networking opportunities. They may in future wish to stand for other roles such as CGWG Chair, Treasurer or Secretary.

Candidates will need to be proposed and seconded by members of the CGWG. Candidates must be members of the CGWG but do not necessarily need to be paid members of the RGS-IBG. (See www.carceralgeography.com/join for information about how to join).

The AGM will be held at the 2nd International Conference for Carceral Geography, 11-12 Dec 2017 at the University of Birmingham. The AGM itself will be on 12 Dec. Candidates, proposers and seconders do not need to be in attendance at the conference, or at the AGM, but must have submitted their nominations to the Chair, d.moran@bham.ac.uk in writing (email is acceptable), by the commencement of the AGM at 9am GMT on 12 Dec. Nominations must include the names of the nominee, proposer and seconder.

Candidates who seek proposers or seconders are invited to use the carceralgeography@jiscmail.ac.uk mail list, to which all CGWG members are subscribed. Alternatively, since the AGM will take place on the second day of the conference, it may be possible for conference attendees to make arrangements during the first day.

Call for Postgraduate Rep(s) for the Carceral Geography Working Group

Doctoral and Masters research students are invited to join the Carceral Geography Working Group committee!

It is intended that at the first AGM of the Carceral Geography Working Group of the RGS-IBG, one or more Postgraduate Representatives, who will become members of the CGWG committee, will be elected.

The role of PG Rep(s), who should themselves be postgraduate students, will be to liaise with the postgraduate community in Carceral Geography, and to assist in CGWG business, particularly the organisation of events and networking opportunities for PG members.

Candidates for PG Rep will need to be proposed and seconded by members of the CGWG. Candidates must be members of the CGWG but do not necessarily need to be members of the RGS-IBG. (See www.carceralgeography.com/join for information about how to join).

The AGM will be held at the 2nd International Conference for Carceral Geography, 11-12 Dec 2017 at the University of Birmingham. The AGM itself will be on 12 Dec. Candidates, proposers and seconders do not need to be in attendance at the conference, or at the AGM, but must have submitted their nominations to the Chair, d.moran@bham.ac.uk in writing (email is acceptable), by the commencement of the AGM at 9am GMT on 12 Dec. Nominations must include the names of the nominee, proposer and seconder.

Candidates who seek proposers or seconders are invited to use the carceralgeography@jiscmail.ac.uk mail list, to which all CGWG members are subscribed. Alternatively, since the AGM will take place on the second day of the conference, it may be possible for conference attendees to make arrangements during the first day, during which there will be a lunchtime session for Early Career Researchers.

2nd International Conference for Carceral Geography – programme announced

The programme for the Print2nd International Conference for Carceral Geography, to be held at the University of Birmingham, 11-12 December 2017, has been finalised, and is available here.

Registration for the conference is open via this online shop. Registration is free, and there are payable items of day catering and a conference dinner which can be optionally added. The last date for conference registration is 5th December 2017. Please note that the last date to register and elect to attend the conference dinner will be 24th November 2017.

2017 is a milestone year for Carceral Geography. It marks forty years after the English translation of Discipline and Punish, twenty years after Teresa Dirsuweit’s ground-breaking study of women’s incarceration in South Africa, and ten years after the publication of Ruth Wilson Gilmore’s Golden Gulag. Given the rapid development of the sub-discipline since and through these milestone publications, the intention of this conference is to recognise the founding of the Carceral Geography Working Group of the RGS-IBG in 2017 with an event which both reflects the diversity and energy of this area of research, and enables further interdisciplinary dialogue and development.

We are delighted that Ruth Wilson Gilmore will be joining us as a keynote speaker at the conference, alongside Andrew Jefferson, James Oleson, David Maguire and Mary Bosworth, and that Chris Philo and Ben Crewe will be presenting their work in a special keynote Dialogue session. The conference will feature ten paper sessions, with 34 papers from 37 authors, as well as an exhibition of the photographic work of Annie Pfingst, a lunchtime networking session for Early Career Researchers in Carceral Geography, a screening of Brett Story’s  The Prison in Twelve Landscapes, and the AGM of the Carceral Geography Working Group of the RGS-IBG

To join us in Birmingham for the conference, register now!